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The Class Meta Ranking for December is based on our findings from our December Wild Hearthstone Meta Snapshot. For Class Meta Ranking analysis, we allocate points to each deck from Tier 0 to Tier 3 then sum them up. The point system for rating a single deck is as below:

Tier 0: 22

Tier 1: 18 (High), 15 (Mid), 12 (Low)

Tier 2: 9 (High), 7 (Mid), 5 (Low)

Tier 3: 3 (High), 2 (Mid), 1 (Low)

Each deck is also assigned a popularity ranking and a respective coefficient multiplier based on its popularity. The highest multiplier is 12 and the lowest is 7. For example, if Odd Paladin is High Tier 1 and has a multiplier of 12, it will bring the class an additional 216 points.

Therefore, a class can be placed highly on the Ranking system based on one (or both) of these elements: having a few strong decks (deck power) or having many decks (class diversity). If classes share the same score, the class with the strongest deck will be ranked higher.

Mage

Rank 1 (+2) – 541 points

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Mage is the undisputed king of Wild after the departure of SN1P-SN4P Warlock. This dominance can be observed simply by looking at how many decks that the class has within Tier 1: THREE — that’s a new record! The class can support a range of different strategies; every single one of them can hold a candle against the strongest decks out there. If you like burn-based Aggro, Secret Mage is probably the best there is at the moment. Time Warp is the pinnacle of fast-paced combo, and grindy control players can turn to the (albeit weaker) renowned Reno Control Mage that has been around for ages.

Even though people have stopped tech-ing against Secret Mages, they can’t seem to find a breakthrough. This can easily be attributed to a much more hostile meta, with both the premier aggro decks (Handbuff Paladin, Pirate Warrior, Aggro Rogue) and the decks that target these (Odd Warrior) can farm a Secret Mage on their good day. However, Secret Mage is still an effective answer to fellow Mage decks and many slower decks out there and is still an important deck to have for the ecosystem.

Time Warp Mage is flourishing now the more consistent, more devastating SN1P-SN4P Warlock has left, bringing Evolve Shaman along with it. Evolve Shaman was a hard matchup for Time Warp, since they can stack high-health minions very early to render Flamewaker useless, and kill the Time Warp player before they finish their quests. With its two natural predators now out of the way, Time Warp only has aggro to deal with. And the Reno version isn’t even afraid of most aggro decks.

If you want to drill Mages for not having any half-decent Midrange deck, then we regret to inform that you might be wrong. You can’t go wrong with a BakuGenn deck, and Odd Mage is a case in point. Descent of Dragons has breathed a new life into the deck, with Malygos, Violet Spellwing, and Cobalt Spellkin being able to generate cheap spells to fuel its powerful turns. Odd Mage has become much better than it was after the Conjurer’s Calling’s nerf, but it still has some distance to cover if it wants to join the big boys.

Overall, while Mage doesn’t present the most playable decks out of all classes, all their decks have a solid presence. They might not have yet reached the height of Warlocks during the SN1P-SN4P meta, but their point accumulation is enough to shake all the pursuers off.

Warlock

Rank 2 (-1) – 425 points

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I can’t hold all these Warlock decks! If you’re looking for sheer diversity, Warlock might be your best pick. Even with the arguably strongest deck in the history of Hearthstone being completely annihilated, Gul’dan showed that he’s still capable of greatness. Cube and Mecha’thun Warlock benefited from the Snippy’s disappearance, and have gone some way in filling the gap left by SN1P-SN4P Warlock.

It is worth pointing out the compelling resurgence from two seemingly forgotten archetypes: Even Warlock and Zoo Warlock. Even Warlock has prospered in a meta with more aggro decks and fewer Zephrys and Priest. On the other hand, Zoo Warlock found its new backbone in the Galakrond package. The Warlock Galakrond might be the most underrated of the five, since it doesn’t usually do a whole lot when it enters play. But the constant token generation from invoking effects seems to be just what Zoo needed to activate its strong but situational cards, like Grim Rally, EVIL Genius, and Plague of Flames. Zoo Warlock has just the right tools for token decks to succeed in Wild at the moment: stacked-up early game stats, constant refill, and good finishers.

Heading the other direction is Reno Warlock. With Quest Mages running rampant, all Reno decks that are naturally weak to it have seen their influence dwindling. Reno Warlock, like many other decks in the same spectrum, doesn’t line up well against the strongest decks in the meta, including Aggro Rogue, Cube Warlock, and Mecha’thun Warlock.

Darkest Hour Warlock and Treachery Warlock have seen successes, but they are few and far between. Darkest Hour, with its coinflippy nature, has taken people to Top 10 and even Rank 1 Legend riding on their incredible luck. But if you play the deck yourself, you will find that there will be days you can’t seem to win a game. Treachery, on the other hand, has a high skill cap and requires a thorough understanding of the meta. There is only one known player who took it inside Top 10 Legend since the launch of Descent of Dragons, and it was Skylight, who has probably played the deck for as long as it has existed.

If you’re looking for a potential contender for the higher tiers, check out Malygos Warlock. Warlock has received some sweet dragon-synergy cards like Nether Breath and Crazed Netherwing, with the former being essential to their Malygos burst package. With Frizz Kindleroost potentially reducing your Malygos to 7 mana, you can find yourself winning games even without playing Thaurissan.

Rogue

Rank 3 (+2) – 333 points

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Rogues might look like they have only climbed two ranks, but in fact their point total has doubled from last month. Necrium Apothecary is the single card that has carried the class, and it is probably the only card that Rogue needs for their pivotal strategies. The weakness of Rogue persists, however: a lack of range in strategies. You want to pressure with Rogue, and it’s about the only thing the class excels at.

Indeed, Aggro Rogue has replaced Odd Rogue as the flagship deck, on the back of this broken synergy-enabler. It can match Odd Rogue’s early game consistency, while having the potential to just steal games in a Big Priest non-game manner. Even with some of our experts not being fully convinced of the deck, it has managed to land itself in the Middle of Tier 1, so you can expect the deck to break the game even more in months to come.

Odd Rogue is right behind Aggro’s tail, and ensured that Rogue is the only class along with Mage that has more than one deck inside Tier 1. With an abundance of token generators like the newly-added Bloodsail Flybooter, Odd Rogue is one of the best decks to abuse the new Faceless Corruptor, and it has allowed the deck to gain an edge in board combat around Turn 5. Bad Luck Albatross has improved the deck’s performance against Reno decks, but its effectiveness in general needs to be carefully gauged.

Big Rogue might soon replace Big Priest in replicating the Timmy experience. Big effect, big minions, big board swings… Big Rogue can offer anything, for a low price of Necrium Apothecary and a coin. Being able to consistently create ridiculous board state on Turn 4 is the reason why this deck might potentially be broken. The good news for many players is that it’s being held back by the plethora of aggro decks, which has prevented it from entering Tier 2.

Kingsbane Rogue and Burgle Rogue are falling off the map. They didn’t get many new cards, and they’re old archetypes that people don’t feel like revisiting. Maybe these decks will be re-refined and will show up again in the future at a modest level of play. Kingsbane, in particular, looks promising. Parachute Brigand and Bloodsail Flybooter might help it getting more consistent early turns.

A package we suggest trying is Fal’dorei Strider and Stowaway, which has ridiculous synergy together. They are only four cards, (Necrium/Whelp package has six cards), and they work well with Myra’s Unstable Element. There might be enough space in Aggro Rogue or Kingsbane Rogue for this mini-package, and maybe they will elevate these archetypes.

Galakrond OTK Rogue might be the most exciting addition that the class has seen in a while. It’s the one Galakrond deck that doesn’t play Galakrond as a win condition, but to enable its combo. With Spirit of the Shark, the Umbra Skulker can give you a crazy amount of coins that you can use as fuel for Spectral Pillager lethals. Flik Skyshiv is a really strong card, but she’s even-costed and control-oriented, so this is about the only viable Wild deck that she’s found her home in.

Paladin

Rank 4 (0) – 324 points

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Unsurprisingly, Paladin is in the same state as they were in last expansion. Their good Descent of Dragons card all went in either already good archetypes like Odd Paladin, or support decks that were so lacklustre before like Reno Paladin only enough to make them suck less.

Mech Handbuff Paladin is still the strongest Paladin deck and the second strongest deck in the game, although it barely received any support. Fewer Zephrys decks mean fewer answers since people don’t naturally include silence effects in their decks. Sky Claw gave the deck another solution if it wants to somehow go wider. Mech Paladin is probably one of the most popular decks on ladder right now after people have stopped experimenting with new decks; the points it earned alone is enough to give Rogues a run for their money.

Odd Paladin is still at the top of Tier 2, with signs that they might creep into Tier 1 if left unnoticed. Paladins are naturally great against most Rogue decks out there, and their rising popularity only helped elevate the archetype. It is also not bad against Mages. On the other hand, Paladins are farmed by Warlocks, who happens to have the best board clears against their recruits. You can’t have the best of both worlds.

The slight increase in points in part came from the introduction of Reno Exodia Paladin in Tier 3. The new Paladin dragons are theoretically strong, and some people have tried to incorporate them into Exodia and Reno Paladin. However, the best performing Exodia build right now has stayed away from all of that in favour of old favourites. It is worth noting that some Paladin dragons might be strong enough on its own in a Control shell (like Amber Watcher), so it’s not necessary to build a dragon deck to support them. Reno Paladin has some of the best healing in the game to make up for their slow board clears. After more refining, Exodia Paladin (particularly the Reno variant) might be able to attain a better position.

Warrior

Rank 5 (+4) – 249 points

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Spectacular but predictable, that can be said about Warrior’s rise to greatness this expansion. They had a lot of ground to cover from the rubble pre-Descent of Dragons, but their clamber has been impressive. Not only that their class-defining archetypes in Pirate Warrior and Odd Warrior are back in full swing, but the class is also harbouring Tempo Galakrond Warrior, a deck with massive potential.

Pirate Warrior is the prominent point-earner of the class. The deck can punish inconsistent starts with persistent early drops, now made even more solid with Sky Raider and Parachute Brigand. The existence of Ancharrr alone makes it so simply exhausting the Warrior is not the definite solution anymore. For these factors, this aggressive deck is expected to stay relevant for some time to come.

Odd Warrior is reintroduced into Tier 2, and might be staying inside it this time. It has always been a queue simulator, a game of ‘do I hit aggro today’, and the lack of a strong end game solution has done nothing to narrow this polarisation. However, Azalina Soulthief might be the solution to Odd Warrior’s lack of value. This will be discussed in the deck’s separate section.

Tempo Galakrond has been making waves in Standard, and it’s no surprise that this success has somewhat been translated to Wild. The main powercreep in Wild for the deck is Brann Bronzebeard, which automatically Invoke your Galakrond twice, gives you 6 attack, casts two Kronx invocations, and nets you 2 extra Scion of Ruin with Rush. Sometimes, the Scions will have massive stats provided by Galakrond and/or Prince Keleseth (if they play it), which can initiate a massive board swing. Tempo Galakrond is pleasantly effective at what it does and comes with exciting potential waiting to be unpacked and refined.

The Galakrond core is strong enough that even Dead Man’s Hand is starting to adopt the package. Dead Man’s Hand has insane synergy with Galakrond: you can shuffle both Kronx and Galakrond into your deck another time, then Kronx will draw your second Galakrond and cast an Invocation, then Galakrond will draw you another Kronx, and the cycle continues. It may be worth it to include some copies of Dead Man’s Hand in existing tempo decks just to potentially pull this off. For now, Dead Man’s Hand is sticking with Coldlights, which can be reliably fetched by Galakrond.

Warrior might not be the strongest class, but it’s the most important class in the meta at the moment. It’s like the substance that regulates the flow of the meta and denies any deck that tries to break the status quo to become the next Tier 0. If Mages become too prevalent, Pirate Warrior steps up. If aggro is too much to handle, Odd Warrior is going to have a field day. Both of the decks themselves have inherent drawbacks the prevent them from breaking the parameters themselves.

Shaman

Rank 6 (-4) – 198 points

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Poor Shamans. They were actually in a very good spot before the nerfs came to hit on them, them only, and no one else. It had to be done for the health of Standard as a format, but these nerfs have inadvertently pushed Shaman from contenders for the top spot to the boundary of irrelevancy.

Even Shaman is one of the few decks that were unaffected by the nerfs, playing none of the axed cards. It hasn’t too many new tools, but the favourable meta and the option to play Golakka Crawler has propelled the deck to the top of Tier 2 once again. Against Control, however, it is a bit too fair, with Vessina being the only extreme power spike.

Of the seven decks presented in the relevant tiers, six of them are down in Tier 3. This anomaly is mostly caused by the abrupt nerf to both Shaman forerunners at once: Galakrond and Evolve. It is not exactly known how weaker Mogu Fleshshaper has become in Evolve archetypes, but one thing for sure is that the deck is seeing much less play now. Mogu, along with Desert Hare, is the card that brought Evolve Shaman to the apex of their strength, and it getting the nerf axe has to be a massive blow to the deck. We feel like Evolve Shaman is still relatively strong with Desert Hare, Corridor Creeper, Doppelgangster, and even a 9-mana Mogu, and Galakrond Shaman might still be half-decent if it adopts a slower core like it had in Standard. For now, we have no way to find out, so we made the conservative decision of placing both decks in Tier 3. One thing for sure is that you can no longer mindlessly slot the Evolve package into every single Shaman deck out there.

With traditional Shudderwock no longer able to abuse Evolve mechanics, Reno Shudderwock Shaman might be the strongest Shudderwock sub-archetype there currently is. Shudderwock builds now have enough value and flexibility to overcome many decks, while the abundance of strong board clears mean, like Reno Priest, you can slot in many answers without being afraid of losing consistency. Shudderwock Reno Shaman is comfortable into many decks at the moment.

The final deck that has received some support is pure Aggro Shaman. In lieu of Evolve, the deck utilises some new cheap, efficient Overload cards like Storm’s Wrath, Squallhunter, Surging Tempest, and Cumulo-Maximus. Cumulo-Maximus is probably more overrated than thought to be, since it costs 5 mana and requires overload to activate its ability, so in truth, you need to play it at least turn 6. Nevertheless, with an abundance of support, it might be enough to push the deck higher in the upcoming weeks.

Priest

Rank 7 (-1) – 87 points

Quantity does not always equal quality. With all six decks in Tier 3, Priest saw it point reserves halved following Descent of Dragons. Priest is probably the class that received the fewest playable Wild cards, and that has affected its performance. Its strongest decks — Inner Fire Priest and Reno Priest — both didn’t gain anything meaningful and found themselves fallen in ranks. Meanwhile, new archetypes have failed to make their marks. If this trend keeps up, Priest is in the hotspot for the weakest class this expansion.

Reno Priest is still a strong deck, but the rise of Quest Mages in general has not been well-received. They do have an abundance of reactive answers, but none of those matters if they can’t interact with Arcane Giants and Mana Giants the turn they come down. For these reasons, they find themselves at the Top of Tier 3 along with many other Reno decks. Otherwise, Reno Priest is a solution for Aggro deck, if you play enough early cards and don’t go uber greedy. You can outgreed the greed decks with Madame Lazul, Archbishop Benedictus, or simply killing them with Spawn of Shadows.

Inner Fire Priest, on the other hand, seems grim. The famous aggro-combo vanguard is mostly abandoned after Extra Arms! nerf, and it is now mostly too slow to beat Priest and not consistent enough to beat Warlocks. The newest version do play high value taunts like Injured Tol’vir and Witchwood Grizzly that can be brought back with Psychopomp, though, so it gives the deck a decent chance against faster aggro decks. The Dragon version might bring back some attention too, with Big Ol’ Whelp and Scalerider bringing solid reinforcement. The deck is just not good enough against aggro and loses horribly to Plague of Flames, so it’s definitely not the best deck to champion right now.

Togwaggle Priest, touted as ‘the next big thing’, has failed to make a splash. It is just like Miracle APM Priest, it’s just that you have to draw your whole deck and have to spend two turns playing 8 mana cards. It’s just not going to work out. You are extremely vulnerable the two turns you play Togwaggle and Murozond (to cast the Ransom spell), and you’ll eventually run out of resources. Maybe a more proactive strategy like APM Chef Nomi Priest or APM Holy Smite can work better.

Speaking about APM Priest, they did make a return in the form of Grave Horrors and Chef Nomi. The deck spams spells on Test Subject to cast Grave Horrors and Arcane Giants for very cheap, Seance them (or Chef Nomi) for multiple finishers. Maybe the old APM is better, but this is definitely more flashy.

Mind Blast doesn’t beat aggro, doesn’t beat combo, doesn’t beat Ice Block. Big Priest is a shadow of itself, although it’s still frequently played at low ranks. The rest of Priest looks like a lost cause. Priest will have to get used to their own mediocrity, but they probably had already done so many times before already.

Druid

Rank 8 (0) – 82 points

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The effect is gradual, but the constant nerf to Druid’s core ramp engine seeped away its strength like a terminal poison. Breath of Dreams provides substitution for Wild Growth and brought the attention back to Ramp and Malygos Druid, but the problem is that you have to play dragons along with it. Embiggen is a good card as long as you draw it Turn 1. Treants are treants. Druids are not functioning well with a band of mismatch mended together like a bandaid on an open wound.

Jade Druid, the best Druid deck before the expansion, didn’t receive any new card. It can also armour up itself out of Time Warp Reno Mage’s range, but it is out-tempoed by many decks such as Galaxy Reno Mage, Cube Warlock and Reno Hunter. It also doesn’t beat up Aggro often anymore. Aggro deck can simply cheese out games with value generators like Ancharrr, Divine Favor, and Aluneth. Even Shamans play Devolve. Druid only loses a couple of percentage for every matchup, but collectively it dragged the deck down by a lot.

Aviana Druid is a Jade Druid that has more clunky pieces in exchange for a definite out once those pieces are played. Its matchup spread is not too different: it beats up Control more and loses to Aggro more. In a more Aggro-oriented meta, it seems that Aviana Druid performs worse than its brother.

Aggro Druid is now trying to build around the new card: Embiggen. On paper, the card is really good since it is both good value and tempo that weaponises many weak cards in your deck like Patches. However, there are two issues with the deck. First, it encourages you to play weak cards on their own to gain value out of Embiggen, like Stonetusk Boar. Simply getting +2/+2 on your minions won’t cut it in Wild. Second, it’s useless if not drawn early. If there’s not a way to tutor Embiggen consistently, the deck will not be consistent enough for competitive play.

The Dragon core in Druid shows potential but needs more support. Breath of Dreams is the glue that’s sticking the pieces together, draws you a card and gets you to your big drops earlier. Both Ramp Taunt Druid and Malygos Druid are trying to build-around the Dragon package to exploit this interaction. The new Emerald Explorer provides both value and a big body guarding your face, while Evasive Drakonid is just a generally solid card. Maybe we will see these decks surfacing in stronger forms after an expansion or two.

Druid and the two other classes in the lowest bracket suffers from the same problems: not only they are weak, they don’t seem to have any mean to make themselves stronger. These new decks introduced seem like the best they can do at this point.

Hunter

Rank 9 (-2) – 75 points

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After a short expedition outside of its frequent zone, Hunter is once again the worst class. This time, however, there is light at the end of the tunnel. Reno Hunter has been one of the best performing Reno decks at the moment, and is showing signs of doing even better. Mech Hunter is being underplayed, but Hot Air Balloon, Goboglide Tech, and Dragonbane might equip the deck with enough firepower.

Reno Hunter keeps the essence of Hunter pressure and enhances it with the flexibility provided by Zephrys, Reno and Dinotamer Brann. To contest the faster meta, Reno Hunter is playing more secrets and early game cards, since Veranus, Dragonbane, and Dragonqueen Alexstrasza already shored up your mid-to-late game. Cutting N’Zoth seems like a wise thing in retrospect.

Mech Hunter is not seeing play but it should be revisited. Maybe the deck is not given as much support as many other decks, but it can be strong enough to get onto the Top of Tier 3 again.

The Odd and Hunter duo are looking more than just memes now, as they’re looking to replicate the success that Face Hunter in Standard had. Toxic Reinforcement is less effective in Wild where there’s a lot more healing, but the incremental damage from Odd Hunter’s hero power does get through frequently enough. Managing your damage and your own health total in the race against other aggro decks is vital because they are actually the tough matchups for Odd Hunter. For now, Odd Hunter stays at the bottom of Tier 3. Phase Stalker is a strong enough card for Wild, and it’s used to best effect in Even Hunter where you can easily tutor your secrets for one mana. Even Hunter weaponises their hero power with Garrison Commander, Steamweedle Sniper, and Dragonbane, and the secrets actually help them controlling the early game against other tempo decks fairly well. It seems like a capable deck, but we will have to wait and see.

Hunter

Rank 8 (-1) – 82 points

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After a short expedition outside of its frequent zone, Hunter is once again at the bottom, only edging out Druid thanks to having Reno Hunter in Tier 2. This time, however, there is light at the end of the tunnel. Reno Hunter has been one of the best performing Reno decks at the moment, and is showing signs of doing even better. Mech Hunter is being underplayed, but Hot Air Balloon, Goboglide Tech, and Dragonbane might equip the deck with enough firepower.

Reno Hunter keeps the essence of Hunter pressure and enhances it with the flexibility provided by Zephrys, Reno and Dinotamer Brann. To contest the faster meta, Reno Hunter is playing more secrets and early game cards, since Veranus, Dragonbane, and Dragonqueen Alexstrasza already shored up your mid-to-late game. Cutting N’Zoth seems like a wise thing in retrospect.

Mech Hunter is not seeing play but it should be revisited. Maybe the deck is not given as much support as many other decks, but it can be strong enough to get onto the Top of Tier 3 again.

The Odd and Even duo are looking more than just memes now, as they’re looking to replicate the success that Face Hunter in Standard had. Toxic Reinforcement is less effective in Wild where there’s a lot more healing, but the incremental damage from Odd Hunter’s hero power does get through frequently enough. A card that we are seeing great potential is Stormhammer, a weapon that doesn’t lose durability if you have a Dragon. Scalerider is another dragon-synergistic card that deals immediate damage, and we think that Marsh Drake, Primordial Explorer, and Nightmare Amalgam can make the package worth it. Managing your damage and your own health total in the race against other aggro decks is vital because they are actually the tough matchups for Odd Hunter. For now, Odd Hunter stays at the bottom of Tier 3. Phase Stalker is a strong enough card for Wild, and it’s used to best effect in Even Hunter where you can easily tutor your secrets for one mana. Even Hunter weaponises their hero power with Garrison Commander, Steamweedle Sniper, and Dragonbane, and the secrets actually help them controlling the early game against other tempo decks fairly well. It seems like a capable deck, but we will have to wait and see.

Druid

Rank 9 (-1) – 82 points

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The closest race to the dumpster we’ve ever seen ended with Druid losing out by the narrowest of margins. Sharing the same point total but having the Top deck ranked lower, Druid is officially the weakest class for the first time since the report commenced.

The effect is gradual, but the constant nerf to Druid’s core ramp engine seeped away its strength like a terminal poison. Breath of Dreams provides substitution for Wild Growth and brought the attention back to Ramp and Malygos Druid, but the problem is that you have to play dragons along with it. Embiggen is a good card as long as you draw it Turn 1. Treants are treants. Druids are not functioning well with a band of mismatch mended together like a bandaid on an open wound.

Jade Druid, the best Druid deck before the expansion, didn’t receive any new card. It can also armour up itself out of Time Warp Reno Mage’s range, but it is out-tempoed by many decks such as Galaxy Reno Mage, Cube Warlock and Reno Hunter. It also doesn’t beat up Aggro often anymore. Aggro deck can simply cheese out games with value generators like Ancharrr, Divine Favor, and Aluneth. Even Shamans play Devolve. Druid only loses a couple of percentage for every matchup, but collectively it dragged the deck down by a lot.

Aviana Druid is a Jade Druid that has more clunky pieces in exchange for a definite out once those pieces are played. Its matchup spread is not too different: it beats up Control more and loses to Aggro more. In a more Aggro-oriented meta, it seems that Aviana Druid performs worse than its brother.

Aggro Druid is now trying to build around the new card: Embiggen. On paper, the card is really good since it is both good value and tempo that weaponises many weak cards in your deck like Patches. However, there are two issues with the deck. First, it encourages you to play weak cards on their own to gain value out of Embiggen, like Stonetusk Boar. Simply getting +2/+2 on your minions won’t cut it in Wild. Second, it’s useless if not drawn early. If there’s not a way to tutor Embiggen consistently, the deck will not be consistent enough for competitive play.

The Dragon core in Druid shows potential but needs more support. Breath of Dreams is the glue that’s sticking the pieces together, draws you a card and gets you to your big drops earlier. Both Ramp Taunt Druid and Malygos Druid are trying to build-around the Dragon package to exploit this interaction. The new Emerald Explorer provides both value and a big body guarding your face, while Evasive Drakonid is just a generally solid card. Maybe we will see these decks surfacing in stronger forms after an expansion or two.

Druid and the two other classes in the lowest bracket suffers from the same problems: not only they are weak, they don’t seem to have any mean to make themselves stronger. These new decks introduced seem like the best they can do at this point.

Contact

RenoJackson

Hijodaikan

Beeozan

SmellyHuffer

Goku

Eddetektor

Weatherlight

Kohai

燁魔

Memnarch

xtuliop

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